Beacon Hill

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The Beacon Hill Walk begins at the Massachusetts State House with the statues
of two seventeenth century women religious dissenters. The walk continues up, down, and across Beacon Hill, often paralleling the Black Heritage Trail. Starting with intense activity in the period before and after the Civil War and continuing into the nineteenth century, women writers and artists living here supported social movements ranging from anti-slavery to suffrage. The walk pays particular attention to the story of Beacon Hill’s African American women and of Boston’s first women doctors and professional nurses. Beacon Hill is a designated Historic District with narrow, steep, sometimes cobblestone streets, and brick homes featuring beautiful doorways and window boxes. It was first developed by the Mount Vernon Proprietors in 1795. Charles Street along its western edge includes antique and specialty shops, restaurants, and grocery stores.

Begins:
T Directions: Go to the statue of Mary Dyer in front of the East Wing.

Time: 1 1/2 hours

Begins: Massachusetts State House

Directions: Go to the statue of Mary Dyer in front of the East Wing.

(Click on a number for details on each site.)
Beacon Hill Walk of Boston Women's Heritage Trail

1: Statues of Women Dissenters: Mary Dyer and Anne Hutchinson 2: Hepzibah Clarke Swan and Julia Ward How 3: Rose Nichols and Nichols House Museum 4:Portia School of Law 5: Elizabeth Peabody’s Kindergarten 6: Home of Louisa May Alcott 7: Museum of African American History and Abiel Smith School 8: African Meeting House 9: Home of Rebecca Lee Crumpler 10: The Vilna Shul 11: View of Massachusetts General Hospital, Linda Richards and Mary Eliza Mahoney 12:  Hayden House, Ellen and William Craft 13: Home of Susan Paul 14: St. Margaret’s Convent 15: Anne Whitney Studio 16: Home of Margaret Deland 17: Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin,  Florida Ruffin Ridley, and<br /> The Woman’s Era Club 18: Annie Adams Fields

1: Statues of Women Dissenters: Mary Dyer and Anne Hutchinson State House, fronting the East and West Wings
Two of Boston’s earliest dissenters were Mary Dyer (d. 1660) and Anne Hutchinson (1591-1643). Mary Dyer, a Quaker, witnessed on the Boston Common two times before she was hung for heresy. Anne Hutchinson was banished from Boston after she accused the Puritan oligarchy of preaching that “good works” would bring God’s grace. As a pledge of their friendship and shared belief in the role of religious dissenters, Mary Dyer walked beside Hutchinson after she was excommunicated from the Puritan church. Return to top

2: Hepzibah Clarke Swan and Julia Ward Howe 13-17 Chestnut Street
Designed by Charles Bulfinch ca. 1806, this house represents the lives of two notable Boston women: Hepzibah Clarke Swan (1757-1825) and Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910). Swan was one of the five original members of the Mount Vernon proprietors whose goal was to transform Beacon Hill into a fashionable neighborhood. She built the three row houses at numbers 13, 15, 17 for her daughters and another for herself at number 16. Her collection of French furnishings is now in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, as are several of the family portraits she commissioned Gilbert Stuart to paint.

Julia Ward HoweJulia Ward Howe, who is best known as the author of The Battle Hymn of the Republic written at the beginning of the Civil War, lived at 13 Chestnut during that period, one of her several residences in Boston. Howe was a noted reformer and early participant in the women’s club movement after the war. She was joined by a group of women, including Caroline Severance (1820-1914), in founding the New England Women’s Club in 1868, one of the first women’s clubs in the country. Howe was a leader in the woman suffrage movement and helped found the Woman’s Journal. Howe read papers at the meetings of the Radical Club, a club for women and men who were “daring thinkers” which often met at this site.

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3: Rose Nichols and Nichols House Museum 55 Mount Vernon Street
Rose Standish Nichols (1872-1964) was among the first well-known women landscape architects and a lifelong pacifist who lived on Mount Vernon Street her entire life. She traveled extensively throughout the world and developed an interest in international politics. She left her house to the public and as a place for offices of organizations promoting international friendship.

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4: Portia School of Law 45-47 Mount Vernon Street
Portia School of Law began in 1908 when two women who wanted to take the Massachusetts bar examination asked Attorney Arthur W. MacLean to tutor them. His wife, Bertha MacLean, named the nascent school after “Portia” who disguises herself as a lawyer in Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice. The informal school expanded and became the only school providing legal education for women exclusively. In 1920 the first L.L.B. degrees were awarded to thirty-nine women.

In 1923, Blanche Woodson Braxton (1894-1939), a graduate of Portia Law in 1921, became the first African American woman to be admitted to the Massachusetts Bar. She later became the first African American woman admitted to practice in the U.S. District Court in the state. The first woman president of the Board of Trustees of New England School of Law was Anna E. Hirsch (1902-97), a 1928 graduate of Portia Law. Hirsch was elected register of probate for Norfolk County in 1954 and 1960.

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Elizabeth Palmer Peabody5: Elizabeth Peabody’s Kindergarten 15 Pinckney Street
One of the locations for the kindergarten of Elizabeth Palmer Peabody (1804-94) (see C1), considered the founder of the kindergarten movement in the United States, was at 15 Pinckney Street which, although destroyed, was the mirror image of 17 Pinckney Street. Influenced by the ideas of Friedrich Fröebel, Peabody became an advocate for kindergartens nationwide, publishing the Kindergarten Messenger and organizing the American Froebel Union. She was a link between the visionaries of the Transcendental movement and educational reformers.

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6: Home of Louisa May Alcott 20 Pinckney Street
photo of Louisa May AlcottAlthough author Louisa May Alcott (1832-88) is best known for her book, Little Women, describing her family life in Concord, Massachusetts, she had several Boston homes. The daughter of famed Transcendentalist Bronson Alcott, she lived here in rented rooms as a child.

As an adult, she often stayed with other reformist women in the “sky parlor” of the Bellevue Hotel on Beacon Street, owned by Dr. Dio Lewis, principal of Boston’s Normal Institute for Physical Education, and near her publisher, Roberts Brothers. In the last decade of her life, Alcott purchased a home for her family at 10 Louisburg Square, but was too ill to enjoy it for herself. She died at the age of 55, probably of poison from the mercury used to treat the typhoid fever she contracted as a Civil War nurse.

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7: Museum of African American History and Abiel Smith School
46 Joy Street
The Museum of African American History, which was founded in 1964 by Sue Bailey Thurman (1903-96), acquired the neighboring African Meeting House in 1972. Among its former directors was Ruth Batson (1921-2003), a leading civil rights activist in Boston. She was chairperson of the education committee of the Boston NAACP that led the fight in the early 1960s against segregation in the Boston Public Schools and a founder and later director of the METCO voluntary desegregation program.

The Abiel Smith School served African American children from 1835 to 1855 until the state legislature passed an act allowing them to attend the school closest to their homes. The change was prompted by the actions of Benjamin Roberts, an African American, who sued the city in 1848 stating that his daughter Sarah Roberts was unlawfully refused entrance to five schools between her home and the Smith School. Although Roberts lost his case despite the help of prominent abolitionists, his actions had the long term effect of opening all Boston Public Schools to African American children.

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8: African Meeting House 8 Smith Court
The church, the oldest standing African American church building in America, was built in 1805-6 in the heart of Boston’s Afrcan American community on the north slope of Beacon Hill.

Among women abolitionists active in this church before the Civil War was Maria Stewart (1803-79) who challenged other free African American women:

“O, ye daughters of Africa, Awake! Awake! Arise! No longer sleep nor slumber, but distinguish yourselves. Show forth to the world that ye are endowed with noble and exalted faculties.”

Stewart is credited as the first American-born woman to speak in public before an audience that included both men and women.

Susan Paul, whose father was the minister, joined other African American women to form a temperance society in the 1830s. William Lloyd Garrison founded the New England Anti-Slavery society here in 1832 and the church became a center for abolitionist activity. Escaped slaves William and Ellen Craft (1826-97) were active in abolition meetings here.

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9: Home of Rebecca Lee Crumpler 67 Joy Street
Dr. Rebecca Lee Crumpler (1831-95) is considered to be the first African American woman doctor. She received a “Doctress of Medicine” in 1864 from the New England Female Medical College in Boston’s South End, later merged into the Boston University School of Medicine. Born in Delaware, Crumpler was raised in Pennsylvania by an aunt. She came to Charlestown in 1852 where she worked as a nurse. After she received her degree, she practiced in post Civil War Virginia. With her husband, Dr. Arthur Crumpler, she next moved back to Boston where she set up her medical practice on Joy Street. She focused on women and children and emphasized nutrition and preventive medicine. She pulled together her experiences and knowledge in A Book of Medical Discourses in Two Parts.

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10: The Vilna Shul 14-18 Phillips Street
The Vilna Shul was built in 1919 to serve the Jewish community on Beacon Hill as a synagogue and community center. Although it closed in 1985, the building has been restored as a Jewish cultural
center. Before they built the synagogue, the congregation of Lithuanian Jews worshipped in temporary spaces for nearly twenty-five years. They named the synagogue for the city of Vilnius, because they considered it to be the center of Jewish culture in Lithuania. Many of the original members of the congregation emigrated from Vilnius where there was a large and thriving Jewish community. Only a few decades later it was destroyed by the Holocaust.The names of the women who were among the founding members of the synagogue are listed in a plaque in the back of the sanctuary. Although the entire congregation sat on the same level, the women’s section was separate from the men’s section but equal in size (which was typical of synagogues of that time). The Vilna Shul is also a significant site because it represents the large Jewish community who made their first Boston homes in the old West End and on the north slope of Beacon Hill.

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11: View of Massachusetts General Hospital, Linda Richards and Mary Eliza Mahoney(from corner of Phillips and Grove Streets)
Linda RichardsLinda Richards (1841-1930) pioneered professional nurses’ training at Massa-chusetts General Hospital. In 1873 she had received the first diploma from the country’s first nursing school which was organized at the New England Hospital for Women and Children. The hospital, founded in Roxbury in 1863 and run by Dr. Marie Zakrzewska (1829-1902) and a board of women reformers, is now the Dimock Community Health Center.

The Palmer-Davis Library at Massachusetts General is named for Sophia Palmer (1853-1920) and Mary E. P. Davis (1840-1924), both students of Linda Richards. Palmer and Davis co-founded the American Journal of Nursing and created the American Nurses Association by bringing together alumnae associations of nurses’ training
schools.

mary_mahoneyMary Eliza Mahoney (1845-1926), the first African American woman to become a registered nurse, also graduated from the New England Hospital. Mahoney is honored by a medal awarded annually by the American Nurses Association. Mary Vincent (1818-87) was an actress whose friends funded the Vincent Memorial Hospital, part of Massachusetts General, in her memory in 1891. The women of the Vincent Club continue to raise money by producing an annual theatrical show. The hospital pioneered in women’s health, including the development of the “Pap Smear.”

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12: Hayden House, Ellen and William Craft 66 Phillips Street
Ellen CraftThis station on the Underground Railroad was a destination for many fugitive slaves, including Ellen Craft (1826-97) and her husband, William. In 1848 she disguised herself as her master, bandaged as if ill, and tended to by her husband as if he were the slave. They escaped from Georgia by taking the train and steamer to Boston. After two years in Boston where they were active in the anti-slavery cause, they sailed to England, staying until after the Civil War because the new Fugitive Slave Law endangered their lives. Harriet Hayden (ca. 1816-93) and her husband, Lewis Hayden, both born slaves, owned this house for more than forty years. They worked with Underground Railroad “conductor” Harriet Tubman (ca. 1820-1913), known as the “Moses of her People,” in moving slaves to safe havens (see SE5, 6). Harriet Hayden bequeathed a scholarship for “needy and worthy colored students” at Harvard Medical School.

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13: Home of Susan Paul 36 West Cedar Street
In the 1830s, Susan Paul (1809-41) taught at the Smith School on Joy Street, a segregated school for African American children funded jointly by the city and private donations (see B7). Paul was also an officer in the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society founded by Maria Weston Chapman in 1832 (see D24). She was the daughter of Thomas Paul, the founder of the African Baptist Church, and supported her mother after his death. Some of her letters were printed in William Lloyd Garrison’s Liberator. In 1834 she wrote to condemn the “spirit which persecutes us on account of our color—that cruel prejudice which deprives us of every privilege whereby we might elevate ourselves—and then condemns us because we are not more refined and intelligent.”

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14: St. Margaret’s Convent 19 Louisburg Square
Originally founded in Sussex, England, in 1855 to care for the poor and ill in the surrounding countryside, this Episcopalian religious community came to Boston in 1873 to act as superintendents of a children’s hospital. The sisters moved to three townhouses on Louisburg Square in 1883 which they used as a convent, chapel, and small hospital. Here, they expanded their nursing and evangelical teachings to reach the sick and poor on Beacon Hill and its environs. They ran St. Monica’s Home, a nursing home for Black women and children, on Joy Street and later in Roxbury until 1988. In 1992, the St. Margaret’s community moved the Motherhouse to Roxbury.

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Home of Louisa May Alcott 10 Louisburg Square
In the last decade of her life, author Louisa May Alcott (1832-88) purchased this residence for her family. See stop #6 above.

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15: Anne Whitney Studio 92 Mount Vernon Street
Anne WhitneyThe window on the top of this building marked the studio for two decades of sculptor Anne Whitney (1821-1915), who was part of a group of American women sculptors gathering around actress Charlotte Cushman (see N11) in Rome in the mid-nineteenth century. In 1873, soon after Whitney returned to Boston, she received a commission for the statue of Sam Adams now standing outside Faneuil Hall. Her statue of Leif Eriksson is on the Commonwealth Avenue Mall (see BBE1, BBW21). Her bust of Lucy Stone is in the Boston Public Library, and her sculpture of abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison is in the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Whitney had a “Boston marriage” with her longtime partner Adeline Manning. During the late Victorian era, such marriages between women, generally professional and upper class, were both common and accepted by society at large.

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16: Home of Margaret Deland 76 Mount Vernon Street
Margaret Deland (1857-1945) was a popular novelist at the turn of the twentieth century and a social reformer. Her twenty-five works of fiction were set both in historical and modern times and dealt with making ethical decisions in different settings. Although she considered herself a “new woman” determined to preserve her freedom of action, she did not support woman suffrage. Her charity was personal; she took young unwed mothers into her home until they could become self-supporting, believing that their love for their babies would provide an incentive.

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17: Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Florida Ruffin Ridley, and The Woman’s Era Club 103 Charles Street
Josephine RuffinJosephine St. Pierre Ruffin (1842-1924), African American editor and publisher of The Woman’s Era, the journal of the New Era Club, lived here for two decades. She founded the club for African American women in 1894. A year later, she organized a national conference to form the National Federation of Afro-American Women to show the existence of a “large and growing class” of cultured African American women. They met at the Charles Street A.M.E. Church (now Charles Street Meeting House) and merged with the Colored Women’s League to form the National Association of Colored Women in 1896. Ruffin served as the first vice president. Although it was accepted by the Massachusetts State Federation of Womens’ Clubs, the New Era Club was refused membership in the national federation in 1900 for fear of offending Southern members.

Florida Ruffin Ridley (1861-1943), Ruffin’s daughter, became the second African American teacher in the Boston Public Schools. She was active with her mother in the New Era Club as well as in the League of Women for Community Service. She also became a member of several predominantly white clubs, including the Twentieth Century Club and the Women’s City Club of Boston. In addition to her work as a club woman and civil rights activist, Ridley was an essayist and journalist, focusing much of her writing on race relations in New England. In the 1920s, her interest in history led her to found the Society of the Descendants of Early New England Negroes. Through this work, she hoped to connect an understanding of history with contemporary work for social justice. African Americans and whites have always been involved, she wrote, “in the eternal war for justice and liberty which the state has waged.” Then, as in her own time, she believed both races deserved an equal place in society.

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18: Annie Adams Fields 148 Charles Street
Although the home of Annie Adams Fields (1834-1915) and her husband, publisher James T. Fields, at the end of Charles Street, does not survive, it was the site of their important literary salon. After his death in 1881, Annie Fields continued to support the work of many women writers, including Sarah Orne Jewett (1849-1909) who spent winters with her, poet Louise Imogen Guiney, and Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-96). Fields was also active in charitable works. She spent many hours at the Charity House on Chardon Street and cofounded the Cooperative Society of Visitors, a case review agency that made recommendations to the central administration of Boston’s relief organizations for aid disbursement. The Society was absorbed into the Associated Charities of Boston. Fields’s book How to Help the Poor (1884) served as an unofficial guide to the programs and policies of Associated Charities.

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